About Edward

Edward has been a member since July 16th 2010, and has created 1159 posts from scratch.

Edward's Bio

Hi, My name is Edward Forsythe, I have a passion for helping people achieve enough passive income through investing in the right vehicles to secure their financial future. I will be sharing with you several financial facts to help you make better decisions investment.

Edward's Websites

This Author's Website is http://prophetmaxprofits.com

Edward's Recent Articles

Your Questions About The Claxton

Richard asks…

Could this team win a championship playing in the WNBA?

PG: Smush Parker
SG: Speedy Claxton
SF: Adam Morrison
PF: Brian Scalabrine
C: Kwame Brown

6th man: DJ Mbenga

Edward answers:

Men’s college teams can win a WNBA championship, like it means anything.

Daniel asks…

for all you doubters out there?

hey there i’m Josh Claxton future NBA’er and this for all you doubters out there when ‘m in the NBA most of u will be looking at this and sayng he wrote this,i’m gong to the NBA for u idiots who think i can’t!i’m going not just because i love the sport but because people say i can’t and that makes me just wanna go more,so u guys don’t think i can make it? well geuse what?i can!

Edward answers:

Ok, Josh. Good Luck.!!!!

——————————————-

Mary asks…

Random Basketball Question: Which NBA/College Basketball player has the coolest name?

My picks are:

Carlos Boozer
Zaza Pachulia
Speedy Claxton
O.J Mayo
Rudy Gay
Danny Granger

……..im bored, any other names?
Clyde Drexler or Nick Van Exel is a pretty dope name
Ike Diogu has to be the best name…

Edward answers:

This is obvious.

Latrell Sprewell has the coolest name in basketball history.

I mean, it’s uncommon, it rhymes, and it has a nice ring to it…Did I mention it rhymes!?!

And to add, the guy was one of the premiere guards in the NBA for a long time, and was an all-NBA 1st team and all defensive second team selection. My point? He had game to back up his name!

A runner up to Spree (even the nick is cool) has to be God Shammgod.

Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_Shammgod

Paul asks…

Which {surname} do you like the most?

I thought this might be something a little different :)

These are all surnames of people that I know. Which one do you like the most?

Wilde
Knox
Grace
Brodie
Carr
Claxton
Bright
just a reminder…these are LAST NAMES not baby names.

Edward answers:

I love Wilde, Knox, Claxton, and Bright!

Wilde is my favorite =)

Nancy asks…

Where is Speedy Claxton?

Edward answers:

Until the last week of the regular NBA season, you would have found Speedy Claxton sitting on the Atlanta Hawk’s bench in a really nice suit. Just as he has for the last two seasons with the Hawks. He did, however, get into uniform for the last 2 regular season games and 1 of 4 playoff games vs. The Miami Heat where he has averaged less than 4 minutes a game.

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Your Questions About Best Investments For Retirement

Daniel asks…

Examples of successful retirement investments?

Can you give me some real examples of successful retirement investments? Thanks! :)

Edward answers:

As a late starter age 55 I had to invest every spare penny
I had and take chances. My portfolio consisted of a
moderate/aggressive allocation into mutual funds. I had
both an IRA and a 401K in which I invested all I could.
I went through 2 major dips, but held on and even invested
more on those dips. As of this time my gains are a bit
over 8% and now in my retirement years, I am drawing
down on my investments.

Betty asks…

Retirement Planning-Retirement Coach. NOT investment planning.?

55 years old, I need to find a source for tactical decisions like when to downsize house considering continuing income/tax ramifications. Don’t need an investment planner, I’ve done a much of that positioning, now need a specific coach to send in a game plan so I can proceed in an orderly and smart fashion. I’m trying Search Engines, but everyone is an investment planner. Is there such a beast as a Retirement Coach?

Edward answers:

Yes, there is “such a beast as a retirement coach.” While not beastly, I am an NYU trained and certified personal coach and a certified retirement coach. The focus of CPA’s, financial planners and investment advisers is “what you will have” and the financial aspects of retiring. Issues such as tax considerations of downsizing fall squarely in their expertise,

The focus of a retirement coach is what you will do when you retire, do you have a retirement life plan, how do you define or envision “retirement. ” It can mean different things to different people from working full time (in another job or career), to PT, to not working at all. With a retirement coach you would consider what you want your work, life, leisure balance to be as you approach the 30-35 years period which may constitute your “retirement.” It’s a “whole life,” holistic approach which actually facilitates your financial planning. As an example, “when to downsize” may have more to do with your life plan than it does with tax planning.

I often work with clients and groups using the Retirement Success Profile or the Life Options profile, assessment tools which help with the retirement life planning process. For more information, take a look at my web site www.sbscoaching.com.

Lisa asks…

How do get you access to a 401K retirement investment?

Is it through a bank or is it at the Bank you that you have a savings or checking account with?. and What happens to it when quit the Job that you have the 410K retirement plan with. Also How does it work?.

Edward answers:

401K can only be offered thru an employer.
You elect a certain percentage of your pre-tax earnings to go to the 401K and be invested in funds of your choice.
When you leave the employer you have the choice of keeping the 401K with the employer (but no more contributions go into it), you can roll the 401K into an IRA (individual retirement account that you can open with any bank or broker) or you can wait until your new employer offers you a 401K and see whether you can roll the old one into the new one.
Or… You can get paid out – minus the 10% penalty and the 25% you will owe the tax man when you file your return for the year.

The idea is to keep the 401k’s going until it is time to retire and then make your withdrawals to supplement your social security check.
That you can do when you reach 59 1/2.

An IRA (Individual Retirement Account) and Roth IRA are available thru any bank or financial brokers.

An IRA is funded with pre-tax money and you can deduct your contributions from your tax liability for the year. (it has as many restrictions as a 401K when it comes to taking your money back out before you are 59 1/2 years old)

The Roth IRA is funded with aftertax money and this money is always yours to do with as you please. (But not the interest it accrues… Take out the interest before you are 59 1/2 and you are paying taxes on it).

I prefer the Roth IRA overall. Because once you reach retirement the principal money is yours and can not be taxed again. Who knows what kind of taxes we will have to pay once we get to the retirement age…

David asks…

Retirement investment?

I am age 55, debt free, and plan to retire next year from a government job. I am married and my spouse receives disability. We both have life insurance. We own our home and have 1 rental property which is paid for. I would like to sell it on contract in the future.

I will receive a pension of approx $36,000.00 per year. I will also receive $70,000.00 in drop money.

I have a 457B account through Nationwide Retirement Services (NRS). At this time there is approx $75,000.00 invested in mutual funds and a fixed account earning 3.3%.

I also have $50,000.00 invested in CD’s locally which I just renewed at 1.1%. :(

In speaking with NRS I was told I could invest the drop money with them, they also suggested changes in my investments with the 457B account.

I am leaning towards the fixed account for the majority of the investments and receiving quarterly interest payments throughout the year for fun retirement activities.

I am also concerned about the fees involved with the NRS account.

I would appreciate any suggestions on the matter from the experts.

Edward answers:

At your age I would lean mostly towards fixed sources of income. What type of changes to the 457B account? Is it in more riskier assets with a higher return? That’s not always a good thing…especially since you are so close to retirement. Yes, fixed is boring and the return isn’t huge, but if you can live comfortably off of the fixed rate income then don’t risk it.

BTW…I see a ton of boring guys like you all the time. Government worker who really has no skills besides the one he has been doing for the past 20 plus years….but 9 times out of 10 they could get rid of you and nothing would change…that’s besides the point tho…get up and live brother you sound boring.

Lizzie asks…

Investment/Retirement Question?

I have the option through work to invest in a 401b or 457 plan (this is on top of my retirement through the state). Should I go that route or invest my money monthly on my own through an IRA or diversified stock portfolio?

Edward answers:

Well if your employer does any type of matching on the 403b or 457 that’s a no-brainer, that’s free money. Otherwise, I would just invest in a Roth IRA if you qualify or a Traditional IRA if you don’t. Or whatever other investment you feel comfy with.

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Your Questions About A Municipal Bond Fund

Lisa asks…

Math problem, just need two equations??? Gr. 10?

Solve with a linear equation of 3 variables equivilant to:

Ax + By + Cz +D = 0

John inherited $25,000 and invested part of it in a money market account, part in a municipal bonds, and part in a mutual fund. After 1 year he received a total of $1,620 in simple interest from the three investments. The money market paid 6% annually, the bonds paid 7% annually, the mutual fund paid 8% annually. There was $6,000 more invested in the bonds than in the mutual funds. Find the amount John invested in each category.

thanks a million times to someone that can help me!

Edward answers:

Let x=amount in money market
y= amount in bonds
z=amount in mutual fund
x+y+z=25000
1x+1y+1z-25000=0
.06x+.07y+.08z=1620
.06x+.07y+.08z-1620=0
y=6000+z
0x+1y-1z-6000=0

so the three equations are
1x+1y+1z-25000=0
.06x+.07y+.08z-1620=0
0x+1y-1z-6000=0

solve using a matrix
x = 15000,y = 8000,z = 2000

Ruth asks…

Need help with these math problem here?

Interest rates

1) An insurance fund invests $ 100,000 in municipal bonds and earns 7% per year on the investment. How much money is earned per year?

A. $ 142,857
B. $ 70,000
C. $ 7000
D. $ 1,428,571

2) A lab technician has 319 ml of a solution of water and acid. 4% is acid. How many milliliters are acid?

A. 9.57 ml
B. 15.95 ml
C. 127.60 ml
D. 12.76 ml

3) A chemical solution contains 4% salt. How much salt is in 4 ml of solution?

A. 10 mL
B. 1.6 mL
C. 0.16 mL
D. 100 mL

4) Juliette forgot to study for a test. Of the 200 question on the test, she answered only 35% correctly. How many question did she answer correctly?

A. 70
B. 85
C. 35
D. 50

5) Alex and Juana went on a 30-mile canoe trip with their class. On the first day they traveled 27 miles. What percent of the total distance did she answer correctly?

A. 100%
B. 1%
C. 90%
D. 0.9%

6) Matthew has saved a total of $ 39,000, of which $ 3900 is invested in the stock market. What percent of his total savings is invested in the stock market?

A. 5%
B. 20%
C. 10%
D. 15%

7) In Little League, Andrew hit 5 home runs in 25 at bats. What percent of the at bats were home runs?

A. 18%
B. 25%
C. 20%
D. 30%

8) A banquet dinner is being organized by a club. The actual cost of the dinner is $ 16 per person. The members are to pay $ 4 to attend, with the club making up the difference. What percentage of the dinner’s cost is the member to pay?

A. 17%
B. 25%
C. 15%
D. 20%

9) In basketball, Matthew made 255 baskets in 600 attempts. What percent of his attempts were made?

A. 43 1/2%
B. 42 1/2%
C. 43%
D. 41%

10) Matthew has $ 5000 invested in the stock market. This amounts to 25% of his total savings. How much has Matthew saved?

A. $20,010
B. $ 200,000
C. $ 20,000
D. $ 20,100

Compound Interest

Find the simple interest. Round your answer to the nearest cent.

1) Principal = $ 500
Interest Rate = 10%
Time in years = 5

A. $ 25.00
B. $ 1000.00
C. $ 250.00
D. $ 10.00

2) Principal = $ 2900
Interest Rate = 1 1/2%
Time in years = 8

A. $ 156.00
B. $ 15.60
C. $ 243.75
D. $ 69.33

3) Principal = $ 2900
Interest Rate = 7.8%
Time in years = 1/12

A. $ 18.85
B. $ 188.50
C. $ 226.20
D. $ 1.89

4) Principal = $ 3200
Interest Rate = 5 1/2%
Time in years = 8
A. $ 1548.80
B. $ 1408.00
C. $ 14,080.00
D. $ 1280.00

Assume that simple interest is being calculated in each case. Round your answer to the nearest cent if necessary.

5) Annie’s cafe borrows $ 8300 at 8% for 150 days. Find the total amount that must be repaid after 150 days.

A. $ 11,028.77
B. $ 8327.29
C. $ 8964.00
D. $ 8572.88

6) John forgot to pay his $ 397.00 income tax on time. The IRS charged a penalty of 15% for the 63 days the money was late. Find the penalty that was paid. ( Use a 365 day year.)

A. $ 10.12
B. $ 2.61
C. $ 407.28
D. $ 10.28

7) Robert Hall opened a taxi service company. To pay for start up costs, he borrowed $ 74,000 from a bank at 6% for 1 year. Find the interest.

A. $ 444.00
B. $ 5180.00
C. $ 78,440.00
D. $ 4440.00
2) Principal = $ 1300
Interest Rate = 1 1/2%
Time in years = 8

A. $ 156.00
B. $ 15.60
C. $ 243.75
D. $ 69.33

5) Annie’s cafe borrows $ 8300 at 8% for 150 days. Find the total amount that must be repaid after 150 days.

A. $ 11,028.77
B. $ 8327.29
C. $ 8964.00
D. $ 8572.88

Edward answers:

Wow! Is this your homework? It takes longer to type it in than it takes to do it.

1) An insurance fund invests $ 100,000 in municipal bonds and earns 7% per year on the investment. How much money is earned per year?

100,000*7/100 = 7,000
C. $ 7000

2) A lab technician has 319 ml of a solution of water and acid. 4% is acid. How many milliliters are acid?
319 * 4/100 = 12.76
D. 12.76 ml

3) A chemical solution contains 4% salt. How much salt is in 4 ml of solution?
4 * 4/100 =16/100 = 0.16
C. 0.16 mL

4) Juliette forgot to study for a test. Of the 200 question on the test, she answered only 35% correctly. How many question did she answer correctly?
200*35/100 = 70
A. 70

5) Alex and Juana went on a 30-mile canoe trip with their class. On the first day they traveled 27 miles. What percent of the total distance did she answer correctly?
What question was asked of Juana Heheheheee! You mean what % was travelled on 1st day
27/30*100/1 = 90%
C. 90%

6) Matthew has saved a total of $ 39,000, of which $ 3900 is invested in the stock market. What percent of his total savings is invested in the stock market?
3900/39000*100/1 = 10
C. 10%

7) In Little League, Andrew hit 5 home runs in 25 at bats. What percent of the at bats were home runs?
5/25*100/1 = 20
C. 20%

8) A banquet dinner is being organized by a club. The actual cost of the dinner is $ 16 per person. The members are to pay $ 4 to attend, with the club making up the difference. What percentage of the dinner’s cost is the member to pay?
4/16*100/1 = 25
B. 25%

9) In basketball, Matthew made 255 baskets in 600 attempts. What percent of his attempts were made?
255/600*100/1 = 42.5
B. 42 1/2%

10) Matthew has $ 5000 invested in the stock market. This amounts to 25% of his total savings. How much has Matthew saved?
5000/25*100= 20000
C. $ 20,000

Compound Interest
Find the simple interest. Round your answer to the nearest cent.

1) Principal = $ 500
Interest Rate = 10%
Time in years = 5
500*10/100*5
C. $ 250.00

2) Principal = $ 2900
Interest Rate = 1 1/2%
Time in years = 8
2900*1.5100*8 = 348 (simple interest)
None of them TYPO IN INPUT??

3) Principal = $ 2900
Interest Rate = 7.8%
Time in years = 1/12
2900*7.8/100*1/12 = 18.85
A. $ 18.85

4) Principal = $ 3200
Interest Rate = 5 1/2%
Time in years = 8
3200*5.5/100*8
B. $ 1408.00

Assume that simple interest is being calculated in each case. Round your answer to the nearest cent if necessary.

5) Annie’s cafe borrows $ 8300 at 8% for 150 days. Find the total amount that must be repaid after 150 days.
WHAT!!!! Annie is crazy, tell her to get a credit card at 22% PER YEAR
8300*8/100*150/365 = 272.88 at 8% PER YEAR
No correct answer More typos?

6) John forgot to pay his $ 397.00 income tax on time. The IRS charged a penalty of 15% for the 63 days the money was late. Find the penalty that was paid. ( Use a 365 day year.)
297*15/100*63/365 = 10.278
D. $ 10.28

7) Robert Hall opened a taxi service company. To pay for start up costs, he borrowed $ 74,000 from a bank at 6% for 1 year. Find the interest.
74000*6/100 = 4400
D. $ 4440.00

Mandy asks…

Is it a good time to rollover your municipal bond dividend money into the stock market or just take the money?

My husband and I are having a disagreement over what to do with the money we will make from municipal bonds every 6 months. I want to take the money, he feels it should be rolled over into an advisory solution stock market account.

Edward answers:

That’s where the magic of compounding comes in, when you put the gains back to work….

But I also believe you should reward yourself.

If you took all of it,..You’d never know,.. Except that some of us here know how drastic a mistake that is…Then you should also add other new monies to the fund..

Donald asks…

What exactly is a mutual fund, and how do I invest in one?

I have some settlement money (about $28K) that I would like to invest. Everyone tells me to put it in a mutual fund. Can someone explain to me what exactly a mutual fund is? Will I be able to cash it out whenever, or do I have to keep it in for a certain number of years? Can I buy a mutual fund through Scottrade? What’s the best mutual fund?

Edward answers:

First what is a Mutual fund?
It is a fund, managed usually by a team of people. This fund invests money in different securities. There are many different types of mutual funds. Some funds buy just stocks, they are made up of many different company’s stock. They may have several million in GE, Exon Mobile, Wal Mart etc. Next, there are bond funds which invest in many different types of bonds. Some corporate bonds, government bonds, and municipal bonds. There are also index funds, which invest in certain securities associated with a certain index. For instance, there are S&P 500 index funds, meaning the fund mimics the S&P 500. So if the S&P is up 2% than your fund is up 2% for the day. This is the basic plot for mutual funds, there are many more types.

Owning a mutual fund is like owning shares of stock. You can cash out when ever, there is no time limit or constraint.

While you can buy mutual funds over the internet, it is best to go to a broker. There is usually no commission fee to purchase a mutual fund as would if you were buying stocks. Being new to invseting, you should get the advise of a broker.

There is no best mutual fund, there are thousands of them, and certain people like certain funds. Some grow slow and steady with lower risk, while others have potential to grow very fast, but with more risk. Its a complicated concept at first, but you are making the right decision by investing in a mutual fund.

Michael asks…

What are the best type of mutual funds to hold in a taxable investment account?

I have a balanced account that includes bonds and various classifications of mutual funds. What are the most tax efficient to be held in a taxable account?

Edward answers:

Among stock funds, broad-market index funds and tax-managed funds are generally tax-efficient because they typically generate lower levels of capital gains, short- or long-term.

For bonds you want municipal bond funds, preferably in the state you live in.

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Your Questions About Retirement Income Funds

Mandy asks…

Anybody know about Vanguards Target Retirement Funds?

Hey guys im 19 and looking for something to start putting money into to retire. I would like to retire early at the age of around 45-50. Wondering if this fund would be good since im very inexperienced with investing and stocks and mutual funds. I heard you want low costs to get it going and a good company and alot of other things. Just wondering if this would be a good one or if you knew anything else about it.
Okay, so is it possible to do one of these and retire early at like around 45-50? Cuz isnt with ira u have to wait til ur like 59 and a half or something without being penalized..

Edward answers:

Yes there are a number of companies offering similar balanced funds that change with age. You are also right about fees.

I really like the way the balanced funds operate. They keep their balance between stocks and bonds which means as stocks fall they are buying a little to balance and when the stocks rise and usually bonds fall they are selling a little stock and buying cheaper bonds.

Buying low and selling high automatically. WHAT A CONCEPT! LOLOL.

One previous knock about the Vanguard ones is they were a little too conservative, a little too many bonds, and the index funds they use were TOO diversified like their total market fund, total bond fund, Global or whatever. More average consistant return but slightly lower return. Risk/Reward are related.

So recently, like last year, they “tweaked” them some and added a little more stock for the age target to improve the return some.

I think they are the best for somebody that knows nothing about investing, wants safety to reduce the ups and downs, and justs wants to invest and forget it.

But I think they are too conservative which lowers return, particulary at your age. And the fact they shift by 1% per year to more bonds, less stocks, they get more conservative too fast.

If you were to retire at 50 and you picked a target date fund for that you could start at 30/70 bonds to stock. But thirty years later you would be 60/40 and could live another 40 years. That would be way too conservative for such a long time frame and young age and you run a greater risk of “shortfall”- running out of money by being too conservative.

Yes, taxes are a big consideration. Very basically you want your bonds all in your Tax deferred accounts and want to buy stocks, which don’t generate as much taxes, in your after tax accounts.

I think you should look for a stock fund now, a diversified one to start with, at your age and wait for a company retirement savings, or an IRA, to add bonds or use a balanced fund like these. Then you may want to hold more stocks than they recommend for “retirement” because you have such a long time frame.

Much to consider.

Good Luck.

PS, you also want to look in to a Roth if you have earned income. It might be good for your goal since I believe you can pull out deposits that are five years old without penalty and that helps get you past that hump from your hopefully earlier retirement age to the 59 1/2 age.

Mary asks…

what kind of vanguard fund should I invest under current market conditions?

I am thinking about Vanguard Emerging Market Fund?

Edward answers:

If I was going to invest in just 1 vanguard fund, it would be a target date retirement fund, or maybe the star, or balanced index fund.

My IRA is with Vanguard. I use Prime Cap Core & Equity Income (for large caps), Mid cap index, International Value, a bond index fund & lastly prime money market. Vanguard has many excellent funds, with which to build a portfolio..

Do your asset allocation plan first, then you can pick funds to fit your plan.

Robert asks…

Give examples of fixed income you can retire with. And give examples of mutual funds that are ok for retiremen?

retirements
Please give examples of Fixed income security you can invest in.

Edward answers:

Most experts say that your income in retirement should be at least 80% of your last year’s working income. So, if you earned $100K in your last working year, you should have enough to earn at least $80K/year in retirement income.

One important thing to remember is inflation – it hasn’t been as much of a problem in recent years, but even at 3% (the average for the last 20 or so years), that $80K will lose some of its purchasing power in retirement. Say you’re retired for 20 years – by the end of that period you will need over $140K/year just to keep the same purchasing power of your original $80K.

What types of funds you choose for retirement (and how you allocate them) will depend on your personal preferences, but a generic retirement portfolio should look something like this:

20% Growth & Income (stocks)
20% High Yield (bonds)
20% International bonds
20% Government bonds
20% Intermediate Corporate Bonds

I hope that helps.

Steven asks…

Should I withdraw my retirement funds?

I have worked part-time at the library for about four years. Now that I have my internship and in my last semester in college, I decided to leave this job. After this decision, I figured that since I won’t be coming back, I want to withdraw the money from the retirement fund that the city had for part-time workers.

When I contacted the organization, they said that I will receive a penalty for withdrawing the funds too early. I don’t remember what she said but what is this penalty? Will they take it away from the money that I have? I don’t understand how it works. Should I still withdraw my funds despite the consequences? I really need the money since I won’t be able to work while I have my internship.

Edward answers:

There are IRS-penalties and pension-plan penalties. The IRS-penalties are easier to deal with in the long-run. For instance, you contributed $1 in 2012 to a (traditional or Roth — doesn’t matter) pension fund or IRA. You take out $1.15. You made 15cents. So, you owe an IRS tax penalty on the 15cents you withdrew. The $1 is yours to claim as income, so you just owe tax on that. Of course, if it were a Roth contribution, you only owe the tax penalty on the fifteen cents.

In short, if you need the money, then you need to get the money. You can deal with the tax issues at tax time.

It is also possible that you put your money into some sort of pension fund that has its own penalties. For instance, the administrator may charge you 20% as some sort of fee just to do anything. This is separate from the IRS. While this sucks, I still say, if you need the money, take it. The pension plan admin will still charge you that % (possibly) even if you direct roll it over into some other pension plan (if that is the way it works).

In either case you lose the same amount. So, if you need the money, take it. But do not think that just because you put $100 (let’s say) into a tax-deferred account that you will owe a 10% IRS tax penalty on early withdrawal of those funds. Whether you contributed those funds pre-tax or post-tax, you likely can get your money back with no tax penalty. You only pay the penalty on EARNINGS. Which, of course, are likely very little.

Joseph asks…

An individual retirement account (IRA)?

A) is limited by a percentage of net business earnings
B) Can be used by all taxpayers, reguardless of income level
C) may provide current tax reduction, as well as tax-deferred income earnings for future retirement
D) has a guaranteed retirement amount by the federal gov.
E) is similar to a profit-sharing plan, in that the employer also contributes to the account

Edward answers:

A has nothing to do with an IRA.

B is not correct because there are income restrictions for IRA contributors.

D is not correct because the account is not held by the govt.

E is not correct because an IRA is funded by the owner and the owner of the account alone.

C is correct.

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Your Questions About How To Invest In Silver

Betty asks…

Are Silver Mining stocks a good investment at this time?

Considering the fact that Silver is undervalued, in historical terms, in comparison to the price of Gold. With the price of metals booming and with no end in sight, would investing in Silver Mining stocks be a good investment?

Edward answers:

Yes in my view they are. I see silver at $50 an ounce in the near future. I would have no problem looking into and buying companies such as Silver Wheaton, Great Panther Silver, American Barrick Gold (also has silver mines) and New Gold (Gold, Silver and some copper exposure).

Good luck!

Http://finance.yahoo.com/quotes/slw+gpl+ngd

Carol asks…

What is the best type of silver to invest in?

I have a little more than $1000. i have 3 1oz APMEX rounds and 1 1oz sunshine minting bar and $10 face value of junk silver. i have an assortment of halves, quarters, and dimes and 1 morgan dollar. i am not looking for shtf but an investment to sell later on. i was wondering what the best kind of silver is to invest in. rounds, silver eagles, junk, or or silver maples? any other suggestions would be great. i also have about $100 extra to spend on silver every month.

Edward answers:

Since you are not a coin collector stay away from collector coins such as Morgans and junk silver. Stick to bullion pieces. Keep shipping and handling costs to a minimum. Buying and selling through local coin and bullion dealers is probably the best way to keep costs down.

Susan asks…

where is a reliable place to buy silver and palladium bullions?

im looking at investing in silver in the form of bullions. does anyone know where i can buy silver? id prefer not to use the internet but if there is a reliable place then it will work.

is silver a decent metal to invest in or has it been pretty much replaced by modern precious metals?
thanks

Edward answers:

I own silver. It is a major holding that I have in addition to gold. IMO the bast silver bullion to buy are the Canadian Maple Leaf coins. I like them for several reasons.

(1) They are 99.99% silver. The purest silver in the world. American Silver Eagles are only 99.90%
(2) They have a $5 Canadian face value on them. Also the highest face value silver bullion coin in the world
(3) The premiums are lower then the US Silver Eagles and they hold the premium value for trade in more so then any other bullion coin
(4) They look really nice
(5) They come in tubes of 25 instead of the standard tube of 20 for other coins.
(6) Canadian Silver Maple Leafs are low mintage compared to American Silver Eagles.
(7) They are affordable

As for the best place to obtain silver bullion coins I have found that Monex is the best place and offers the lowest prices. There is a catch to Monex though. They require a $5000 minimum pruchase for silver to get started and then thereafter you can buy the coins in 100 ounce lots. Keep in mind they also charge you 1.75% commission on the purchase and a $30 shipping charge for the first 100 ounces and $5 for each 100 ounces after that. So a first order with monex on silver will run you over $6100 on the first order.

If the Monex minimum is too much for you then I personally keep an eye on Ebay. The problem with attempting to buy silver or gold from local dealers is you are subjected to higher prices as they usually get their product second hand. Some do deal directly with the bullion banks but again they will charge more due to the fact that a local dealer doent do the volume that online bullion dealers do.

As for other metals, they have no history of being money or have been used as money anywhere in the world. I personally dont own other metals but think it may not be a bad idea to own a small amount of other metals other then silver and gold.

Also you need to understand that gold is not an investment. Gold is and acts more like an insurance policy. You are insuring that something in your portfolio can never go to $0.00. All paper assets have the ability to go to $0.00. Silver is also in the gold realm as well, so when talking about gold, silver is included.

Gold is money and a store of value. It is the “Currency of last resort” as Greenspan has stated many times through the years. Gold doesnt pay interest, dividends, doesnt restate earnings, has no lawyers, accountants, CEOs or CFOs lying to you on television. Gold doesnt ask for bailouts, doesnt go BK and cannot cook its books. Gold cant be debased or printed at the will of a company or governmetnt and holds its purchasing power.

Gold sits there as a store of value, is labor intensive, and a one ounce coin will not split into a bunch of half ounce coins at the direction of the pin striped bandits on Wall Street. Also Gold is the ONLY asset class in the last ten years to increase in value and retain every dollar of its purchasing power. This is also true for silver as well.

Thomas asks…

Is it a good time to invest in silver round coins?

Just looking to invest about $200 or so.
To the General, I bought a 10oz bar for a Christmas present to myself one year and the profit depends on how the market is dodo. And I made a pretty good one.

Edward answers:

Gold is your friend. Silver too, but gold is easier to sell

USD will die completely soon
Euro will collapse because greece will break ‘free’
GBP will get sucked in with the Euro

All currencies are pointless.

Reasons of invasion in Iraq and Lybia(yes it was an invasion) were motivated by gold. Go read about it if you don’t believe me.

If you do decide to invest heavily in gold/silver, invest in bullions as they’re easier to offload in smaller denominations

*Edit* general bethlehem, honestly, your name says it all….
Gold/silver will always hold it’s value, always. What I’ve said about the aforementioned currencies is not long term, but in actual fact what is happening right now. I know you’re not dumb, but I don’t understand why you would want to deceive the person asking this question. $100 for doing nothing is better than $0 for doing the exact same thing, is it not? *Edit*

Charles asks…

Where can I buy physical silver bullion in Alberta?

I would like to invest in physical silver bullion that I will store myself. I am looking for somewhere in Alberta, Canada that sells physical silver at a reasonable premium. I don’t have a credit card and don’t want to give banking information so what I want some place that I can go and buy silver for cash.

Edward answers:

Silver’s massive autumn rally has utterly captivated speculators and investors, their appetite for all things silver is insatiable. Interestingly a major driver of this metal’s recent surge was stock-market buying of the flagship silver ETF, SLV. The larger and more popular this fund grows, the greater its ongoing impact on silver prices.

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